Friday, December 27, 2013

Bargains for your Kindle



So you've been kindly gifted a Kindle for Christmas and now you're left wondering where on earth to begin... with so many bargains (hello, freebies!) it can be a tad daunting to know where to begin.  My solution to this problem was just to download anything and everything I came across - not so fab... hopefully I can use my experience for your gain!  These reads will soon get you over the initial 'nothing can compare to a real book' guilt.
And if you're experienced with your kindle - please share any gems you've come across in your travels for our fellow readers. ;)
Share:

Friday, December 20, 2013

Meet Me Under The Mistletoe

Meet Me Under The Mistletoe by Abby Clements is the story of two childhood friends: Laurie and Rachel living polar opposite lives the women, now in their mid-thirties, are counting down the days to two very different Christmases.

Share:

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Gifts For The Book Lover In Your Life

Sure, the book lover in your life would probably love a new book for Christmas but if they're anything like me then they probably already have quite a large 'to-read' list already (buying / finding / borrowing books is never a problem when you have a borderline addiction!)  But there are so many quirky gifts which book-lovers would swoon over; here are a few of my favourites.  If you have any suggestions please pop a link in the comments - there is no such thing as too many ideas when it comes to buying gifts! ;)


Share:

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Wounds

Michael Longley is a poet originally from Northern Ireland.  Born in the same place, in the the same, as a certain Mr Seamus Heaney his poetry has largely been in the shadow of Heaney's.  And that's kind of a problem with poetry: so much of it is no good, so people tend to stick to the poets they have heard of, a name that they recognise and trust.  This poem, for me anyway, is a powerful tribute to not just the memory of his father but also to the innocents lost in wars before.  We always hear of the young boys shipped off oblivious to WW1; but the boy at the end of the poem is walking into the living room of presumably a neighbour.  Losing his innocence in a war fought on his streets, in people's living rooms, against his own people.  It's an unbelievably powerful poem; so even if you've never heard of Michael Longley...just trust me on this one ;)
 
Share:
© Reads and Recipes | All rights reserved.
Blog Design Handcrafted by pipdig